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Aeroponics

aeroponicsOne can safely say that the aeroponics method is technically the best of all the other hydroponics systems that have been developed. No grow media are required with to provide nutrition to plants. The most basic aeroponics system comprises of a reservoir and channels punched with holes to hold the plant. The reservoir contains the nutrients and the channel is used to spray the roots of the plants with these. A nutrient pump is also a valuable part of an aeroponics system that is used to supply organic aeroponics nutrients to the plants’ roots.

As already mentioned, no growing media is needed in aeroponics gardening to supply the essential nutrients to the plant roots. Yet it is entirely possibly to provide them with the most necessary ingredients to grow well – air, water, and nutrients. This method alone renders aeroponics as the most technically designed hydroponics systems.

Building a basic aeroponics system at home also proves to be rather simple and economical. One can make use of some very basic materials that are available at considerably cheap prices. However, for the best results, it is recommended that one should purchase a fully built aeroponics tool kit from a hydroponics shop.

As stated above, the main tool used in aeroponics is the reservoir that holds the nutrition solution that is to be supplied to the plants. The plant roots hang in this reservoir, and this makes it extremely convenient to watch how well they are growing. Additionally, it is also very easy for the plant roots to imbibe the nutrition supply through hanging the reservoir. The Aeroponics cloner that is included with most aeroponics kits helps to make sure that all the plants roots receive a fair and equal supply of nutrients through the reservoir. And it is extremely easy to change the nutrition solution in the reservoir.

Most people prefer to have freshly cultivated herbs and vegetables to use as ingredients for cooking. The aeroponics system has therefore become extremely popular, for it helps to save a lot of time and energy that is consumed in growing these ingredients the conventional way. Moreover, with this system, plants grow more rapidly and turn out to be healthier than if they were grown through any other method. And one can rest assured that that they will also experience consistent good results with aeroponics.

Aeroponics

aeroponicsOne can safely say that the aeroponics method is technically the best of all the other hydroponics systems that have been developed. No grow media are required with to provide nutrition to plants. The most basic aeroponics system comprises of a reservoir and channels punched with holes to hold the plant. The reservoir contains the nutrients and the channel is used to spray the roots of the plants with these. A nutrient pump is also a valuable part of an aeroponics system that is used to supply organic aeroponics nutrients to the plants’ roots.

As already mentioned, no growing media is needed in aeroponics gardening to supply the essential nutrients to the plant roots. Yet it is entirely possibly to provide them with the most necessary ingredients to grow well – air, water, and nutrients. This method alone renders aeroponics as the most technically designed hydroponics systems.

Building a basic aeroponics system at home also proves to be rather simple and economical. One can make use of some very basic materials that are available at considerably cheap prices. However, for the best results, it is recommended that one should purchase a fully built aeroponics tool kit from a hydroponics shop.

As stated above, the main tool used in aeroponics is the reservoir that holds the nutrition solution that is to be supplied to the plants. The plant roots hang in this reservoir, and this makes it extremely convenient to watch how well they are growing. Additionally, it is also very easy for the plant roots to imbibe the nutrition supply through hanging the reservoir. The Aeroponics cloner that is included with most aeroponics kits helps to make sure that all the plants roots receive a fair and equal supply of nutrients through the reservoir. And it is extremely easy to change the nutrition solution in the reservoir.

Most people prefer to have freshly cultivated herbs and vegetables to use as ingredients for cooking. The aeroponics system has therefore become extremely popular, for it helps to save a lot of time and energy that is consumed in growing these ingredients the conventional way. Moreover, with this system, plants grow more rapidly and turn out to be healthier than if they were grown through any other method. And one can rest assured that that they will also experience consistent good results with aeroponics.

Hydroponics Is?

hydroponics-isHydroponics (From the Greek words hydro, water and ponos, labor), is a way of cultivating plants, using mineral nutrient solutions, in water. Soil is not used. Terrestrial plants may be grown with their roots in the mineral nutrient solution only or in an inert medium, such as perlite, gravel, mineral wool, or coconut husk. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydroponics)

It was discovered in the 19th century that plants absorb mineral nutrients as inorganic ions in water. In natural conditions, and although soil also acts as a mineral nutrient reservoir, by itself it is not relevant to the growth of plants. When the required mineral nutrients are introduced into a plant’s water supply artificially, soil is not required for the plant to grow.

Historically, hydroponics was defined as crop growth in mineral nutrient solutions, with no solid medium for the roots. It is a subset if ‘soilless culture’, which only requires that no soils with clay or silt are involved in plant cultivation.

Plants that are not usually cultivated in a natural environment are possible to grow in a controlled climate system like hydroponics.  During the time of World War II, produce was grown with hydroponics on the dry Pacific Island, and this was the first time that hydroponics was used on a large commercial basis to feed people. NASA has also looked to utilize hydroponics in the space program. ‘Ray Wheeler, plant physiologist at Kennedy Space Center’s Space Life Science Lab, believes that hydroponics will create advances within space travel. He terms this as “a life support system with the biological component of growing plants—called a bioregenerative life support system. It has several benefits for NASA.” These Scientists are researching how different amounts of light, temperature and carbon dioxide, along with plant species can be grown and cultivated on planets like Mars. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydroponics)

Hydroponics has taken plant cultivation to whole new level, and its methodology has attracted even those who were scarcely interested in gardening or planting. But, what are the advantages and the disadvantages of hydroponics cultivation?

There are several advantages to growing plants using the hydroponics cultivation method, which excludes the use of soil. Growing time is comparatively much less and less space is required. As well, it entails much less effort and the need for garden maintenance is reduced. Of course, it is economical too, because water is conserved, the nutrients are recyclable, and pest, weed, and diseases problems are better controlled. No soil bred pests are borne, there is higher productivity, and finally, there is increased control over the plants rooting environment.

In spite of the above mentioned advantages, one should also be cautious though, of the demerits of using the hydroponics cultivation methods. These include rather a steep set up cost, and growers should possess the appropriate skills and knowledge to maintain maximum production in commercial applications. While the threat of soil borne pests is absent, but because each plant in a hydroponics system shares the same nutrient, diseases and pests can adversely affect each plant. Also if there is an unfavorable change in climate, plants grown with the hydroponics methods will wither or shrivel. Additionally, warm weather or decreased oxygen may curb production and lead to a loss in crops.

In conclusion, it may be mentioned therefore, that it is necessary to consider both, the advantages and disadvantages of hydroponics. One will therefore be able to make an informed decision this will allow you to make informed decisions on what application is appropriate for one’s respective requirement.

Hydroponic Solutions

With the growing popularity of the hydroponics methods of growing plants, it is a good idea to be aware of the vast variety of nutrient hydroponic solutions available that may be used. These include bloom mix, super shot, mix for lettuce, tomato special, one, two, and three part mixes, and several brands to choose from, like Iguana Juice, Happy Frog, Dr, Hornby’s Big Bud etc.

A common factor in all hydroponic systems is the nutrient solution – the hydroponic solution. This solution consists of all the nutrients that a plant requires, and in a readily absorbed form, it can be provided directly to the roots of the plants. Consequently, you can expect a substantial plant yield, and that is where the basic beauty of hydroponics lies!

Although one may not grasp the scientific formulas and chemical processes involved in the concoction of hydroponics solutions, it may be helpful to be a little knowledgeable about it, just in case anything goes wrong in the plant cultivation process. The hydroponics method is heavily dependent on proper plant nutrition, and it is therefore necessary that one be aware of what is involved in the creation of hydroponic solutions. Discussed below are the factors involved in successfully making a hydroponics solution.

  • Good Water
  • Macro & micro nutrients
  • pH
  • Nutrient mix?

Good Water

It would be wise to get tap or well water tested, if you are going to use it in the hydroponic solutions. You may inquire about this through a health department or call a water company to ask about the calcium content of the water. You basically want to whether you have very hard very soft water. There are plenty of mineral contents and calcium carbonate in hard water. Soft water in

Basically, what you want to know is if you have very hard or very soft water. Hard water has lots of mineral content as well as and calcium carbonate. Soft water has low mineral content, and this is preferable in making hydroponic solutions. It should be noted salty soft water should be avoided.

If the quality of your water is really poor, then you can consider installing an RO (reverse osmosis) water filter. This is especially necessary if you have water heavily laden with minerals. The water will then be alright for making hydroponic solutions.
 Macro & Micro Nutrients 

Given the fact no soil is used in hydroponics, it is necessary that it be supplemented with complete nutrition.

Plants mainly need 6 major macro-nutrients in large amounts. These include nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, calcium, sulfur, and magnesium. These nutrients needed to be contained in all hydroponic solutions in an adequate ratio.

Plants also need micro-nutrients (minute traces of other elements) in order to grow. The nutrient solutions you buy for your hydroponics garden are not the same as other plant fertilizers. They include all the trace elements, too. So hydroponic solutions are like a one-day vitamin supply, well packaged proportionately with traces of iron, boron, manganese, zinc, molybdenum, copper, cobalt, chlorine, selenium, and silicon.

pH

The pH is number that indicates how much acid or alkaline there is in you hydroponic solution. This is necessary, because if the presence of pH is not adequate in hydroponic solutions, the nutrients gets locked out and do not get applied to the plants.

Fortunately, the pH is very easy to control. You may use a pH test kit, or ph ‘dip’ strips.
The proper range of pH for your nutrient solution: 5.5-6.5 (6.0 is ideal).

Which Nutrient Mix is best?

There are some solid and simple suggestions about hydroponic solutions:

  • Purchase hydroponic solutions specifically for hydroponics. Regular fertilizer will not at all be suitable for your garden.
  • Purchase the best quality nutrients that you can. This will go a long way in achieving a substantial plant yield.
  • Avoid ‘organic’ nutrients. These require decomposition which may create an inconsistency in hydroponic solutions. Consequently, such nutrients will be harmful for your plants.

Home Gardens

Home GardenHome gardens, (also known as forest gardens), are found in humid areas. They use inter-cropping to cultivate trees, crops, and livestock on the same land. In Kerala in South India as well as in northeastern India, they are the most common form of land use; they are also found in Indonesia, One example combines coconut, black pepper, cocoa and pineapple. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Home_garden)

In several countries of Africa, such as Zambia, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe, African countries, for example Zambia, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, home gardens abound vastly in rural, peri-urban, as well as urban areas. They are relied upon as vital sources of food security. Most well known home gardens are the Chagga gardens on the slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania and they are an excellent example of the agro forestry system. Women are the main participants in home gardening in most countries, and the food produced is mainly for subsistence.

In Nepal, the home garden is known as the Ghar Bagaincha. It pertains to the land use system, where several types of plants are cultivated and taken care of by household members. The products of these home gardens are mainly meant for consumption by members if a family.

The term “home garden” is often thought of as similar to the kitchen garden but they differ in terms of function, size, diversity, composition and well as features.  In Nepal, the government has never spoken of home gardens as an important unit of food production, mainly because of their small size. They therefore remain neglected from research and development. However, at the household level the system is still thought of as very important given that it is a source of quality food and nutrition for the rural poor as home gardens are crucial contributors to the household food security and livelihoods of farming communities in Nepal. They are usually planted with a mixture of annual and perennial plants that can be cultivated on a daily or seasonal basis. Biodiversity that has an immediate value is maintained in home gardens as women and children have easy access to preferred food, it is necessary therefore that home gardens be promoted for maintaining a  healthy way of life. ‘Home gardens, with their intensive and multiple uses, provide a safety net for households when food is scarce. These gardens are not only important sources of food, fodder, fuel, medicines, spices, herbs, flowers, construction materials and income in many countries, they are also important for the in situ conservation of a wide range of unique genetic resources for food and agriculture (Subedi et al., 2004). Many uncultivated, as well as neglected and underutilised species could make an important contribution to the dietary diversity of local communities (Gautam et al., 2004).’ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Home_garden)

Along with their role in being a source of supplementary diet, home gardens also lead to ‘whole family’ and ‘whole communuity’ participating in the process activity of providing food.. Children, the elderly, and those caring for them can take part in field agriculture, adding other households along with home gardening to their list of activities. This custom was around in several countries of the world where home gardens are popular, for thousands of years.

Home gardens are an example of polyculture and preserve considerable crop genetic diversity that is absent in monocultures. Efforts are afoot today to promote a similar concept in temperate climates.

 

 

Home Gardens

Home GardenHome gardens, (also known as forest gardens), are found in humid areas. They use inter-cropping to cultivate trees, crops, and livestock on the same land. In Kerala in South India as well as in northeastern India, they are the most common form of land use; they are also found in Indonesia, One example combines coconut, black pepper, cocoa and pineapple. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Home_garden)

In several countries of Africa, such as Zambia, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe, African countries, for example Zambia, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, home gardens abound vastly in rural, peri-urban, as well as urban areas. They are relied upon as vital sources of food security. Most well known home gardens are the Chagga gardens on the slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania and they are an excellent example of the agro forestry system. Women are the main participants in home gardening in most countries, and the food produced is mainly for subsistence.

In Nepal, the home garden is known as the Ghar Bagaincha. It pertains to the land use system, where several types of plants are cultivated and taken care of by household members. The products of these home gardens are mainly meant for consumption by members if a family.

The term “home garden” is often thought of as similar to the kitchen garden but they differ in terms of function, size, diversity, composition and well as features.  In Nepal, the government has never spoken of home gardens as an important unit of food production, mainly because of their small size. They therefore remain neglected from research and development. However, at the household level the system is still thought of as very important given that it is a source of quality food and nutrition for the rural poor as home gardens are crucial contributors to the household food security and livelihoods of farming communities in Nepal. They are usually planted with a mixture of annual and perennial plants that can be cultivated on a daily or seasonal basis. Biodiversity that has an immediate value is maintained in home gardens as women and children have easy access to preferred food, it is necessary therefore that home gardens be promoted for maintaining a  healthy way of life. ‘Home gardens, with their intensive and multiple uses, provide a safety net for households when food is scarce. These gardens are not only important sources of food, fodder, fuel, medicines, spices, herbs, flowers, construction materials and income in many countries, they are also important for the in situ conservation of a wide range of unique genetic resources for food and agriculture (Subedi et al., 2004). Many uncultivated, as well as neglected and underutilised species could make an important contribution to the dietary diversity of local communities (Gautam et al., 2004).’ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Home_garden)

Along with their role in being a source of supplementary diet, home gardens also lead to ‘whole family’ and ‘whole communuity’ participating in the process activity of providing food.. Children, the elderly, and those caring for them can take part in field agriculture, adding other households along with home gardening to their list of activities. This custom was around in several countries of the world where home gardens are popular, for thousands of years.

Home gardens are an example of polyculture and preserve considerable crop genetic diversity that is absent in monocultures. Efforts are afoot today to promote a similar concept in temperate climates.

Home Gardens

home-gardenHome gardens, (also known as forest gardens), are found in humid areas. They use inter-cropping to cultivate trees, crops, and livestock on the same land. In Kerala in South India as well as in northeastern India, they are the most common form of land use; they are also found in Indonesia, One example combines coconut, black pepper, cocoa and pineapple. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Home_garden)

In several countries of Africa, such as Zambia, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe, African countries, for example Zambia, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, home gardens abound vastly in rural, peri-urban, as well as urban areas. They are relied upon as vital sources of food security. Most well known home gardens are the Chagga gardens on the slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania and they are an excellent example of the agro forestry system. Women are the main participants in home gardening in most countries, and the food produced is mainly for subsistence.

In Nepal, the home garden is known as the Ghar Bagaincha. It pertains to the land use system, where several types of plants are cultivated and taken care of by household members. The products of these home gardens are mainly meant for consumption by members if a family.

The term “home garden” is often thought of as similar to the kitchen garden but they differ in terms of function, size, diversity, composition and well as features.  In Nepal, the government has never spoken of home gardens as an important unit of food production, mainly because of their small size. They therefore remain neglected from research and development. However, at the household level the system is still thought of as very important given that it is a source of quality food and nutrition for the rural poor as home gardens are crucial contributors to the household food security and livelihoods of farming communities in Nepal. They are usually planted with a mixture of annual and perennial plants that can be cultivated on a daily or seasonal basis. Biodiversity that has an immediate value is maintained in home gardens as women and children have easy access to preferred food, it is necessary therefore that home gardens be promoted for maintaining a  healthy way of life. ‘Home gardens, with their intensive and multiple uses, provide a safety net for households when food is scarce. These gardens are not only important sources of food, fodder, fuel, medicines, spices, herbs, flowers, construction materials and income in many countries, they are also important for the in situ conservation of a wide range of unique genetic resources for food and agriculture (Subedi et al., 2004). Many uncultivated, as well as neglected and underutilised species could make an important contribution to the dietary diversity of local communities (Gautam et al., 2004).’ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Home_garden)

Along with their role in being a source of supplementary diet, home gardens also lead to ‘whole family’ and ‘whole communuity’ participating in the process activity of providing food.. Children, the elderly, and those caring for them can take part in field agriculture, adding other households along with home gardening to their list of activities. This custom was around in several countries of the world where home gardens are popular, for thousands of years.

Home gardens are an example of polyculture and preserve considerable crop genetic diversity that is absent in monocultures. Efforts are afoot today to promote a similar concept in temperate climates.

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